Last edited by Mikagal
Tuesday, May 5, 2020 | History

4 edition of Chronicle of Marcellinus found in the catalog.

Chronicle of Marcellinus

a translation and commentary (with a reproduction of Mommsen"s edition of the text)

by Marcellinus comes

  • 148 Want to read
  • 14 Currently reading

Published by Australian Association for Byzantine Studies in Sydney [Australia] .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Byzantine Empire -- History -- Sources.

  • Edition Notes

    StatementBrian Croke.
    SeriesByzantina Australiensia -- 7
    ContributionsCroke, Brian., Mommsen, Theodor, 1817-1903.
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxxvii, 152 p. :
    Number of Pages152
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL19630480M
    ISBN 100959362665

      In this anonymous addition to the Chronicle of Marcellinus Comes, the events from to are described, with much of the text devoted to the conquest of Italy by the Byzantine general Belisarius. 1 Sept. 31 Aug. 13th indiction, consulship of Belisarius alone. 1. "Count Marcellinus and his Chronicle is the first comprehensive study of Marcellinus, a courtier of the emperor Justinian, and his chronicle covering the eastern Roman world from AD to Marcellinus' chronicle provides a first-hand account of the Nika riots at Constantinople in , as well as other direct glimpses of political and religious life in the imperial capital in the early sixth century.

    The Chronicle of Marcellinus, A translation with commentary (with a reproduction of Mommsen's edition of the text) (Byzantina Australiensia) by Brian Croke and a great selection of related books, art and collectibles available now at   Ammianus Marcellinus was the last great Roman historian, continuing the histories of Tacitus from AD 96 down to his own day. The first thirteen of his thirty-one books are lost: the remainder describe AD - Walter Hamilton translated Plato's Symposium, the Gorgias, Phaedrus and Letters VII and VIII for Penguin Classics. Andrew Wallace-Hadrill is Professor of Classics at Reading Brand: Penguin UK.

    Ammianus Marcellinus has 65 books on Goodreads with ratings. Ammianus Marcellinus’s most popular book is The Later Roman Empire (A.D. ). Princeton University Library One Washington Road, Princeton, New Jersey USA phone | fax.


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Chronicle of Marcellinus by Marcellinus comes Download PDF EPUB FB2

Count Marcellinus and his Chronicle constitutes the first comprehensive study of Marcellinus, a courtier of the emperor Justinian, and his chronicle covering the eastern Roman world from AD to Brian Croke casts new light on the career of Marcellinus and develops a case for understanding his Latin chronicle as an essentially Byzantine document written by an educated imperial : Brian Croke.

Count Marcellinus and his Chronicle constitutes the first comprehensive study of Marcellinus, a courtier of the emperor Justinian, and his chronicle covering the eastern Roman world from AD to Brian Croke casts new light on the career of Marcellinus and develops a case for understanding his Latin chronicle as an essentially Byzantine document written by an educated imperial by:   Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published.

The Chronicle of Marcellinus by Marcellinus comes,Australian Association for Byzantine Studies edition, in EnglishPages: The Chronicle of Marcellinus | Brian Croke (trans) | download | B–OK.

Download books for free. Find books. The Chronicle of Marcellinus: A Translation and Commentary: (with a Reproduction of Mommsen's Edition of the Text) Marcellinus (comes), Brian Croke, Theodor Mommsen Australian Association for Byzantine Studies, - Byzantine Empire - pages.

The Chronicle of Marcellinus A translation with commentary (with a reproduction of Mommsen's edition of the text) Series: Byzantina Australiensia, Volume: 7. MARCELLINUS COMES (6th century A.D.) CHRONICON Mommsen, Chronica Minora II, (Paris ) CHRONICON Migne, Patrologia Latina, vol.

The Miscellany: The Latin Library. The Chronicle of St. Jerome. Introduction. The Chronicle of St. Jerome was composed around AD and became the primary available source of information on dates and events Chronicle of Marcellinus book the time of its composition until the end of the middle ages.

Jerome’s work itself was a translation into Latin of the Chronicle of Eusebius of Caesarea, brought up to date, but it was through Jerome that it came to. Buy The Chronicle of Marcellinus: A Translation with Commentary (with a Reproduction of Mommsen's Edition of the Text) (Byzantina Australiensia) Translation by Marcellinus Comes, Brian Croke (ISBN: ) from Amazon's Book Store.

Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders.5/5(1). Johannes Malalas wrote a chronicle of world history, from the creation up until his own time ( A.D.), in 18 books.

His chronicle is especially valuable for the local information which he preserves about Syria and the city of Antioch. However the chronicle should be used with caution, because it contains many blunders and inaccuracies. John Malalas, (born c. Antioch?, Syria, Byzantine Empire [now in Turkey]—died c.

), Byzantine chronicler of Syrian origin. Malalas’ Chronographia in 18 books is a compilation of history from the Creation certainly toperhaps tobut the single extant manuscript ends with events of The greater part of it stresses the importance of Antioch and has a Monophysite flavour.

The Later Roman Empire chronicles a period of twenty-five years during Marcellinus’ own lifetime, covering the reigns of Constantius, Julian, Jovian, Valentinian I, and Valens, and providing eyewitness accounts of significant military events including the Battle of Strasbourg and the Goth’s Revolt.

Chronicle of Marcellinus. English & Latin. Language. English, Latin. Latin text and parallel English translation on facing pages, numbered in duplicate.

Imprint. Sydney: Australian Association for. Open Library is an open, editable library catalog, building towards a web page for every book ever published. The Chronicle of Marcellinus by Marcellinus comes; 3 editions; First published in ; Subjects: Sources, History; Places: Byzantine Empire; People: Marcellinus comes (fl.

); Times: ToJustinian I, The Chronicle of Marcellinus: a translation and commentary, (with a reproduction of Mommsen's edition of the text).

The last of the most recent batch of translations from McMaster Museum of Art is a full page of Latin. It is the first page of a longer document, and it cuts off mid-sentence. This is a selection from the Chronicles of Ammianus Marcellinus.

I found a text online at. Count Marcellinus and his Chronicle constitutes the first comprehensive study of Marcellinus, a courtier of the emperor Justinian, and his chronicle covering the eastern Roman world from AD to Description: Count Marcellinus and his Chronicle constitutes the first comprehensive study of Marcellinus, a courtier of the emperor Justinian, and his chronicle covering the eastern Roman world from AD to Brian Croke casts new light on the career of Marcellinus and develops a case for understanding his Latin chronicle as an.

Description: Count Marcellinus and his Chronicle constitutes the first comprehensive study of Marcellinus, a courtier of the emperor Justinian, and his chronicle covering the eastern Roman world from AD to Brian Croke casts new light on the career of Marcellinus and develops a case for understanding his Latin chronicle as an essentially Byzantine document written by an educated.

Marcellinus' chronicle provides a first-hand account of the Nika riots at Constantinople in, as well as other direct glimpses of political and religious life in the imperial capital in the early sixth century.

It also testifies to the confrontations in the Balkans between the Romans and the Huns, Goths, and Bulgars. Ammianus Marcellinus. Written By: Ammianus Marcellinus, (born c.Antioch, Syria [now Antakya, Tur.]—diedRome [Italy]), last major Roman historian, whose work continued the history of the later Roman Empire to There also survives a further continuation, in six books, of the Chronicle down to the year written by a number of mostly anonymous writers (called Theophanes Continuatus or Scriptores post Theophanem), who undertook the work at the instructions of Constantine : c.

–, Constantinople.The Chronicle of Marcellinus The predominant aspects of the chronicle are Marcellinus' treatment of events in his native area of Illyricum and of Constantinople itself [including the reigns of Anastasius, Justin and Justinian] The chronicle is an important source of information for the successive invasions of the Huns (,